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at 1110. new mexico state vs. st. louis. oregon and oklahoma state. cal vs. u.n.l.v. and the nightcap is montana vs. syracuse. >> the cal and u.n.l.v. game is unusual. in giving cal a home game in the bay area they are the lowest thing. u.n.l.v. the five seeded team. they usually do not allow lower see to get a regional lead manager. the committee also usually does not give cal, 18 a rematch. the reason they are have a rematch cal and you nld played earlier you in tell the ran the gamoneunlv r mnlunl >> thank you mike will take a break and go on the golden gate bridge and take a quick shot. traffic moving well. nice weather for today. we're watching the lead out of the middle east president obama steps up to the poll in to speak a few words will >> president obama had lunch with the for palestinian residents abas they're holding a press, but now let us listen in. >> the palestinian authority is more efficient and transcparent. >> palestinian security forces are stronger and more professional. serving communities like bethlehem where president abbas and i will visit the charge of the n
mean, we were his ally. >> it's good to -- today is to remember the warnings of u.n. weapons inspector hans blitz. it's a day to acknowledge the admonitions of leaders like general anthony zeni. eric shen who was forced into retirement when he disagreed with the bush cheny strategy. if we are truly remembering what it was like ten years ago today, we can't forget the millions of voices who opposed this war and attempts made to margin liz them. if you were a public figure, it was not a wise time to speak out against the administration. actress jeanne was called an iraqi sympathizer. >> saddam must love you and i'm sure -- >> don't even try and do that -- i'm not a saddam hussein apoll gist -- i don't think he said is that great news. >> michael moore was booed off the stage for denouncing the invasion of iraq. so much for these bleeding heart liberals in hollywood. let us not forget the response from around the globe. u.n. secretary annan said the war was illegal. nelson mandela called it a threat to peace. pope john paul ii said the war would not solve problems of man. jesse jackson ca
specifically? guest: i spent five years in iraq as the u.n. spokesman, i got to know it intimately. let me tell you that iraq is a pretty much destroyed country. the constructed in many ways. physically and otherwise. there is no reconciliation. after 10 years of war in iraq we find that the country is more divided than ever. as we have seen from john kerry's visit today, the tensions between the united states and this government, not very cordial. imbued with a lot of tension. a lot coming back from the community of nations they have not really a implemented. i would say that it is all because of a constitution that failed the entire public at large. basically taking segments of society and addressing themselves to them. host: this unannounced trip that you just indicated in iraq, these officials with the president on his trip, the associated press pointed out that there were a series of meetings over flights. iran says that this is humanitarian aid and that syria is getting the weapons or else. guest: a whole concern, as the israelis feel that regardless of everything going on, they look to t
to the u.n. and a fox news contributor. general jack keane is also with us, a four-star retired general and former chief of staff of the u.s. army and a fox news military analyst. aaron david miller is a former advisor to six secretaries of state. he is also the author of, the much too promised land. aaron, let's start with you. this meeting has been written about, much-discussed in the united states. why now? why now for president obama to visit israel? >> oh, i think it is the intersection frankly of politics and policy. obama helped create his own israel problem and not that the prime minister of israel didn't air ba his fair share of the responsibility but the fact these two, probably with the exception of david ben guron and dwight d. eisenhower had most dysfunctional relationship between any american president and israeli prime minister. the president made a political calculation and he was vulnerable and exposed on this he had to take care of old business. too many people thought he was somehow hostile and adversary of the state of the israel. that coincides with policy on two is
between 1980-1988 with the iranians. a regime that invaded kuwait after which u.n. sanctions really put an additional strain on iraqi society, while at the same time strengthening the criminalize networked associate with saddam that really control the country and the police state there. the associated polarizing effect on iraq's communities, how they have become pitted against each other, how the regime had used weapons of mass destruction on his own people, the kurds in the north, and how he had persecuted the majority of the population, the shia population in the wake oof the 1991-92 gulf war. and so, and also other factors associated with his return to face initiatives and the use of really so lofty jihadi ideologies to return peoples frustrations away from his regime and towards the west and israel and so forth. in the context of his conspiracy. the effect that had on iraqi society. so understanding that human dimension of conflict and in particular understanding local conflicts that could occur, how these tribal ethnic, sectarian competition for power and resources to play out. and
is a suspect to embargo. -- is subject to u.n. embargo. there is so much at stake here, if you could -- what specific leverage might the united states employed in those direct discussions that are taking place with the iraqis? intodo not want to go great detail here about our discussions with iraqis. we have discussed the united states resolution with the iraqis. in a sense, in the end, what matters is the government of iraq understand that its own interests will be best served not by facilitating the iranian efforts to prolong the crisis in syria, but rather in bringing about a transitional government that will have good relations with the government in iraq. >> understanding by the iraqi government would be helpful. action by the iraqi government would be necessary to ensure this takes place. i would like to focus on two types of aid. one is military. there is a difference of opinion here on capitol hill. about whether or not provide direct military assistance to the opposition. the argument is made that it is really hard to know where these weapons are going, that they might wind up in th
? guest: i spent five years in iraq as the u.n. spokesman, i got to know it intimately. let me tell you that iraq is a pretty much destroyed country. in many ways.d physically and otherwise. there is no reconciliation. war in iraq weof find that the country is more divided than ever. as we have seen from john they's visit today, tensions between the united , nots and this government very cordial. imbued with a lot of tension. a lot coming back from the community of nations they have not really a implemented. that it is all because of a constitution that failed the entire public at large. basically taking segments of society and addressing themselves to them. host: this unannounced trip that you just indicated in iraq, these officials with the president on his trip, the associated press pointed out that there were a series of .eetings over flights iran says that this is humanitarian aid and that syria is getting the weapons or else. concern, as the israelis feel that regardless of everything going on, they look to the north and in syria they see it disintegrating. weapons are flowing int
, if you want to continue to go down the u.n. road, down the route of international organizations, that's not a road that's going to lead anywhere. so let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. i didn't mention on the israeli side -- i said there was a cop -- convergence on syria. there will be a discussion. you have 400,000 palestinians who are in syria and who are in a very vulnerable position, and it's hard to imagine, even if it's not a much of a public dimension, it's hard to imagine that's not going to be part of the private conversation. sure there will be a focus on the peace issue but also a focus on this, and what if anything we in the international community can be doing to somehow safeguard those palestinians who are there. i would say, with jordan, you're also going to have a public and private dimension. first of all,ing in is a signal of interest which is i think important. here the private dimension has to focus as much as anything on syria. you have 400,000 syrian refugees in jordan today. 100 thon additional since the begin of this year. if the pac
that it wasn't, when the people who were watching this knew it was a terrorist attack. >>anna: u.n. ambassador susan rice blamed the deadly attack on a video. the f.b.i. investigating how a man was able to pose as a pilot and gain ablg ses to the -- access to a u.s. airways cockpit flight in philadelphia. the man had on an air france uniform and i.d. and ended up in the jump seat behind the captain. he was caught when he failed to show real credentials. the airlines says no passengers were ever in danger. those are your headlines this friday morning. >>steve: meanwhile president obama on his way now to bethlehem. he visited israel's memorial to the holocaust victims a short time ago during the third day of his first presidential trip to israel. >>brian: we're live in jerusalem following the trip. hey, leland. >> good morning, brian. the issue from the president is not so much what he's saying. he's saying the same thing in terms of the substantive issues about iran and about a palestinian state. but more about how he is saying it. he's going out of his way to show great empathy towards the isr
with him that says, you know if you want to continue to go down the u.n. road, if you want to continue to go down the route of moving on the international organizations that's not a road that's going to lead anywhere. let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. you know i didn't mention on the israeli side, i said there was a convergence on syria but there will certainly be a private discussion on syria and israel. there will be a private discussion with abu mazen on syria as well. you have 400,000 palestinians who are in syria and who are in a very vulnerable position and it's hard to imagine even if that is not much of a public dimension for the conversation it is hard to imagine that will not be part of the private conversation. sure there will be a focus on the peace issue but there will also be a focus on this and what if anything we in the international community could be doing to somehow safeguard those palestinians who are there. i would say with jordan you're also going to have a public and private dimension. first of all just being there sends a signal of
, decision to invade kuwait then the u.n. sanctions that follow that in the effect it had on iraqi society made it all the more difficult for that society to move toward stability in the wake of the saddam hussein regime. i would blame al qaeda and iraq and those who used masss murder as a principal tactic in the war. i would ask dr. zbigniew brzezinski to visit the cities in iraq that were rocked by these murderous attacks and ask them who they blame. who blame the people committed those murders. in 2005 when we went to a city where life was choked out of it because of a systematic attack by al qaeda, they turned that city into their training base. it is with a connected sniper training, medical training. insurgencies just that happened because people to not like america. these are organizations that mobilize resources and people. this is an enemy organization. courses offer their included kidnapping and murder. they choked the life out of the city. schools have been closed for over a year. marketplaces have a cold. -- been closed. communities have fallen in on themselves -- marketplaces
costly war between 1980 and 1988 with the iranians. a regime that had invaded kuwait after which u.n. sanctions really put an additional strain on iraqi society while at the same time strengthening the criminalize patronage networks associated with so there really control the country and the police state there. the associated polarizing effect on the community's poorer but they have become pitted against each other. how the regime had used weapons of mass destruction of his own people, the kurds in the north and how he persecuted the majority of the population, the shia population in the wake of the 91-92 gulf war. and also other factors associated with his return tough trade initiatives and the use of really appear 11 ideology to turn people's frustrations away from the regime in toward the west and israel and so forth. the context of the crusader conspiracy. in fact the fact that had on the iraqi society. so understanding that the human dimension and in particular understanding global conflict that could occur, how these trouble ethnic sectarian competition for power resources woul
listened to the u.n. weapons specialists. war is great for selling newspapers, you'll always see a retired general on the air as opposed to a howard zene. was there any mainstream immediate he i can't outlet that you think handled the run up to the war in a respectable manner? >> what's often cited rightly was the knight ridder bureau, whose reporters did not rely on the usual sources unnamed in tells sources. they went out and dug around, so actually were much closer to the truth on what happened. sometimes you had to go to sources in england and europe. there were hundreds of thousands of people in the streets. there also were, you know, a lot of people who editor ally urged caution. it was by no means, you know, a vast majority of people who were ready to go to war when we went to war and there were some media people who did well. i've covered this for 10 years you. mentioned my book, the book actually covers the whole 10 year period that talks about other mistakes the media made over time, not just at the beginning, and, you know, that's it -- as you know, the war did go on for quite a
resolution that gets voted on at the u.n. as we are flying back from the region, back to the u.s. on that trip that you, that we were discussing. we went to paris, we went to paris, egypt and then tunis. and it's in the course of those four days that that decision is made. so the conversation was very much, you know, the french are going to go ahead. we can let them do whatever they want, or we can actually try to shape this into something that is going to deliver people. >> host: i think my favorite chapter in the book is the trip to burma, perhaps because it's might be the most, i think, historical. >> guest: yes. i love that chapter. >> host: and just talk about what made that trip so unique. obviously, not very many people are traveling to burma at least from the united states at that time. >> guest: more and more, but certainly at the time it was very, very novel. you know, it was a very special moment, and it goes back to, um, when you look at the big picture of what, you know, my book will do for readers, this is a book that is several things. it is, you know, my persona
to protect civilians. that's the final resolution that gets voted on at the u.n., as we are flying back from the region, back to the u.s. on that trip that we were discussing, we went to paris. we went to paris, egypt and into this. it's in the course of those four days that that decision is made. so the conversation was very much, the french are going to go ahead. we can let them do whatever they want or we can try to shape us into something that is going to deliver. >> host: i think my favorite chapter in the book is the trip to burma, perhaps because it might be the most historical. >> guest: i love that chapter. >> host: just talk about what made that trip so unique. obvious that not very many people have gone to burma. >> guest: more and more of a string of the time it was very novel. you know, it was a very special moment, and it goes back to when you look at the big picture of what, no, my book will do for readers. is this is a book that is several things. it is, you know, my personal story, my perspective on american power. it is the story of hillary clinton as secretary of state and
saying it has no evidence of chemical weapons used in syria. former u.n. ambassador john bolton joins us. good evening, sir. >> glad to be with you. >> greta: why the confusion? i can see maybe confusion who used the chemical weapons, but why the uncertainty whether chemical weapons are used in syria? >> it depends on what the nature of the chemical weapon is. i'm not sure if we've got people on the ground who can do forensics. >> although chairman rogers, and indeed dianne feinstein chairman of the senate intelligence committee late today have gonna lot further than the white house has. so i think we need to get the facts straight, but it points in the direction of some chemical weapons used. was it the assad regime or the opposition? >> and this is a huge difference if it's chemical weapons. so where do we go from there? president obama that's the red line that can'ti be passed. red lines come and go with this administration and i think that's part of the problem. i think we have to come back to what the basic american interest is here and that makes sure that no chemical weapons get o
prime minister said. >> hasn't yet reached the red line that i described in my speech at the u.n. they're getting closer. >> we do have a common assessment on these schedules, on intelligence. we share that intelligence. and we don't have any -- any argument about it. >> whether you hear that, do you worry that the world may say prime minister netanyahu has cried wolf? he said this was urgent. we had a time and now he is saying wait another year. >> i'm confident that prime minister netanyahu will do everything to defend israel and not allow iran to acquire a nuclear weapon. and i'm also hopeful that president obama will indeed, you know, keep our backs or have our backs as he called it. i think america respects the notion that we can't outsource our security to anyone else. and if push comes to shove, israel will defend itself at any price. we hope that we won't need to get to that and the way to prevent it is to create a viable, a credible threat, a paralyzing threat to iran which we're not there quite yet. >> on the peace process, a very crucial topic here. president obama said, loo
change in iraq. you know, in the glass one-quarter full side, they had elections. the u.n. validated the results. they weren't fraudulent. they were a lot more honest than they were in afghanistan. they have a parliament. the council of representatives. they passed a budget recently. there is political life in iraq. it's--y. it's-- whatever malikis an authoritarian figure but he's nothing like a saddam by anybody's estimation. so i just-- while there are reasons to be concerned in iraq and reasons to worry about the future, i don't think we should paint an entirely dark picture. and i think if you asked iraqis you'd get different perspectives. if you asked the kurds, i think they're glad there was the invasion. they have more autonomy than they've ever had before, having relations with the turks. if you ask the shi'a, they were empowered but there are probably-- despite the fact they're empowered, there are elements that resent the americans. resent the invasion because they were lodged from the top of the pyramid but theyt miss the americans, many of them, because we're not there in
in recent days. u.n. secretary-general ban ki-moon condemned the unconstitutional seizure of power and called for the swift restoration of constitutional order. >> police in south san francisco are searching for a serial arsonist who started three fires in the city over the weekend. police said two fires were lit in orange park on memorial drive and a third was started near the 500 block of el camino real. all three fires were quickly extinguished and caused little damage, police said. no suspect information was immediately available. [ male announcer ] at scott, we don't spend money creating gimmicky words like "hyper-softacular" to tell you our new extra soft just got softer. instead we give you deals and rewards when you join scott shared values. sign up at scottbrand.com. oh, i couldn't help myself... >> there is a mild start. temperatures in the 40's and 50's. the sea breeze will kick in between 20 and 30 m.p.h.. the expecting cooler conditions than what we saw this weekend. changes as we finish of the workweek. at 5:30 this quick commute check. traffic is slow on the 580 thro
the u.n. general assembly, an american secret service agent accidently discharged the shotgun in the direction of the iranian leader as he was getting into his motorcade in new york. the close call, quote, scared the hell out of u.s. officials who would worried ahmadinejad might use it against them. he never mentioned it again. mysterious. >>> ahead in our money lead without my dedicated twitter followers what would i do with my day? maybe accomplish something. it's twitter's birthday, my tweets. to celebrate i sit down with the hacker turned ceo behind it all. >>> plus, our pop lead. word on the street is that the suits at nbc are showing jay leno the exit. what does abc's jimmy kimmel thing about the soon-to-be out of work comedian? >> i do think he's capable. i've seen him. i mean, listen. the guy is one of the great comedians. >> you think he's dumbed down his material? >> yeah, i think so. that's fair to say. this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day..
quickly it will not be automobile to be detected by u.n. weapons inspectors and u.s. intelligence service that. is real concern that is the issue prime minister netanyahu and president obama have to agree. uma: on issue of syria, chemical weapons, what are the thoughts at this moment? is there viable evidence to say those weapons have actually been used? >> certainly those are the claims and i think there will be a u.n. investigation into this but that clearly has been a red line president obama has drawn and needs to draw and it will be very critical that if there are chemical weapons being used by the assad regime president obama responds accordingly. that is another red line he is drawing. that is red line irisraelies will be watching and iranians. is this president serious about committing to red lines and honoring the red lines. uma: quickly with obama speaking to young people in israel, that was very interesting strategy on his part because he knows he often does well in those kind of settings, at that type of theater backdrop. >> i think that's right. president obama shown in the u
of u.n.h. has made over $1 billion in salary and perks in the last decade of united health care. i mean, so that's where a lot of this money's going for. i've just been steaming the last three days. my three to four biggest lies about iraq, number one, larry lindsey, the advisor chief economic advisor to bush still appears regularly on cnbc claimed the iraq war would cost 100 to 200 billion. he was fired. number two. hal: $2.2 trillion is the number. caller: yeah. hal: that's the soft number. caller: yeah. hal: it will not cost any less than that. caller: you can't make this stuff up. hal: $100 billion. caller: this is a quote verbatim, i would be shocked if this takes longer than six months. it's now 10 years. hal: right the longest war in american history. caller: how many people, cheney, rumsfeld said, we have said al-qaeda is involved, they're going to hand off weapons to al-qaeda al-qaeda, al-qaeda. how many times did we hear that? exactly from dick cheney himself, who at the time he said it knew it was absolutely false. we have to go to break. there are a lot of calls. you bring u
are not seeing any of it the way the u.n. rules work. as long as the u.n. is recognizing the assad government that aid is not allowed to go into opposition territory which is where most of the refugees are so a whole calderon of issues. >> changing topics just a bit. some things only happen every four years, presidential elections and olympics and leap years. this weekend the senate did something it hadn't done in more than 1,400 days. they actually passed a budget. the all-night session stretched from thursday night to saturday. keystone lpipeline. they did pass the budget although by a margin of just one vote. >> the average budget resolution considered 78 amendments. we have done 101. the average 35 amendments, we have done 70, twice as many. doing this has been herculean feat. >> i know everyone is exhausted and you may not feel it at the moment but this is one of the senate's finest days in recent years and i commend everyone who has participated in this extraordinary debate. >> not a single republican supported the plan. one of the finest days in the history of the senate. four democrat
mortars fell near a mascus hotel where u.n. staffers have been staying. >> all of the national staff at that office have been asked to work from home until further notice. these measures are being undertaken solely for security reasons. the united nations remains active and committed to helping the syrian side in this political solution. >> this news comes as soil and blood samples are being smuggled out of syria, now in the hands of the u.n. they're testing it for nerve gas after the assad regime and the rebel forces accused one another of shooting off deadly missiles suspected of carrying chemical weapons. >>> and this is a sign you need new brakes. look at this. a cadillac smack dab on a roof of a house in california. the couple inside told our affiliate wabc they were driving down a hill and couldn't stop, turn a corner. next thing they knew, boom, off the road, in the air, on a roof. >> the air bag deployed and i don't even see where we're going from there because the view was obscured and i just couldn't stop. we're very, very lucky. >> so lucky indeed. a neighbor used a ladder
the fear of god into the iranians. >> megyn: what does it mean for us? when netanyahu went before the u.n. and held up that bomb and drew a red line. what he's saying in this clip, we could reach the point of no return in iran, with its nuclear efforts by spring or summer of 2013. 2013, we're there, ralph, we're this. we're in the spring of 2013. so if we really have given him the green light and he does believe the point of no return is likely spring or summer of 2013, what does the horizon hold? >> well, nothing good. now, prime minister netanyahu was talking how it might take iran out to a year to develop a bomb. so the time line shall the goal postses are shifting on this one, but nonetheless i stick by my longstanding view that for israel to do it alone is a mistake. if this absolutely must be done, and i would regret it, but if it must be be done, it's better for the united states to hit iran, only we have the power not only smash the iranian nuclear program in itself, but to prevent iran's retaliation, to do that you have to take out air defense, intelligence, revolutionary guard.
. the u.s. did nothing. the u.n. did nothing. the mayor, the council and citizens of los angeles did that. and it looks very different. new york it's not the port. in new york it's also not transportation. compared to place like phoenix and san diego use car the way they do in the west. but here the bulk of carbon emissions come from buildings poorly insulated, old, darkrooms, tar room, attracting the sub. so here mayor bloomberg niche initiated a crucial round of trying to get better insulation in old buildings, better insulated new buildings more efficient air conditioning, heating with change the six from four, to two, maybe to alternative energy. paint the rooms white. again, by local municipal laws and cooperative action and private-public partnership. you can begin to actually make an sphwhaict is measurable in the course of a year. that states simply haven't and can't do. and then you find these cities coming together in the c40 in other global environmental intercity organizations exchanging best practicing and you find what new york and l.a. have done can be replicated in other p
the consumer. >> reporter: dramatic reductions came not through carbon tax or u.n. mandate, private sector forces and technologies greens oppose. >> process of fracking natural gas creates a significant amount of greenhouse gas emissions. >> reporter: so they oppose high i can fracturing because the more natural gas, lower the price. longer it would take before wind and solar replace fossil fuels and are cost competitive. back to you. heather: william la jeunesse, live for us, thank you. bill: the spring season pull ad houdini. where did it go? a a major snow storm is battling the midwest. that is look at white stuff throughout the country. tough going out there. it was supposed to be spring right? heather: old man winter has not given up. >> all i heard was we would have snow. i didn't hear how much we were getting. this is quite a lot. >> is this frustrating. this is march or spring. >> every year seems like it is like this. so just have to relax. bill: here we go on the 25th of march. snow records have been shattered, yet another spring storm burying parts of the country and taking its
reductions came not because of a carbon tax or a u.n. mandate but market forces and private sector technologies greens oppose. >> the process of fracking natural gas is, creates a significant amount of greenhouse gas emissions. >> reporter: greens also oppose fracking because it does mean more natural gas and lower prices. and that of course makes wind and solar more expensive, jon. you will continue to see the fight over fracking, about carbon taxes and subsidies for wind and solar. back to you. jon: william la jeunesse. good explanation there. thank you. jenna: your chances weren't that great of winning the fourth biggest jackpot in powerball history but somebody out there beat those 175 to 1 odds. how about that? now we're getting some word about where the winning ticket was sold. we'll have those breaking details for you up ahead. >>> the new health care law turns three years old over the weekend. what do we know about its true costs and requirements for everyday americans? we'll take a closer look ahead. [ male announcer ] every famous curve has an equally thrilling, lesser-kn
before the u.n. general assembly and saying, look, they've got all the parts and pieces they need to build weapons of mass destruction. how much more skeptical was the press supposed to be? >> well, you are setting up the bush administration's case for war in iraq. and the united states went to war in iraq. congress supported the president's policy on going to war, and the media supported it what this all adds up to, however, since it didn't work out that way, was that somebody got it drastically wrong. american intelligence got it wrong, the brits got it wrong, the israelis got it wrong, everybody did which means somebody in our society -- and it ends up being the media -- has to stand up and say let's think about this a little bit rather than rush into a war. we are now at a point, jon, where an american president can determine when the united states goes to war, whether the congress approves of it or not. we don't deal with deck la rightses -- declarations of war any longer. and so at this particular point, who other than the media ought to stand up and say, wait a minute, let'
involvement, there would have to be a u.n. security council resolution regional agreement and an agreement among the 28 patients. so within nato, what we are focused on is defending now with syria. and we would move patriot missiles down to do that. in terms of what else is happening in an individual nation by nation basis, there is a great deal of discussion of everything you mentioned, no-fly zones, arms embargoes, etc. it is moving individually, but it has not yet come into nato as an overall nato type of approach. it is focused, planning, being prepared. but the movement at the moment is in the individual national way. >> does that include some countries that are thinking about the possibility of going after at least some of serious air defense? >> yes. >> thank you. >> senator? >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> i want to get some clarification. i am disturbed about the answers that you just gave. i know that general jacoby, that would've been better asked. however, you are responsible for the homeland. when we talk about the capability of iran, we talk about both western europe and the
at that in light of what they have determined is appropriate to the finds u.n. >> do you think there could be a scenario where you have qm to my qualified mortgage in one scenario. to me that will lead to massive confusion. >> the way it's written, this rule as it is now, morgan said is not otherwise a qualified mortgage could be so if it passes through the automated underwriting system. >> the other question i have -- this may be on the taxpayer protection issue. and i only have like a man left. it's very complicated. in my opening statement i talked about 187 billion or ever the exact figure is and then we talked about the over nine and a half billion in net income. what does that figure actually go to? does it ever touch that 1,807,000,000,000? will it ever if it takes -- keeps generating profits? i guess, the taxpayers ever going to get the money back. >> the amount the taxpayers have put and with regard side covering losses of fannie and freddie is not being, with that amount, is not being reduced and cities dividend payments. the taxpayer is getting back to return on the capital. a d
done solely for security reasons after a number of mortar shells reigned down the hotel housing u.n. staff. most employees are being temporarily relocated to buy route and cairo. the move comes as violence rages across the region. a top rebel was wounded and dozens of new deaths being reported just today. >>> it was a sour day on wall street with stocks closing lower amid worries a bailout deal struck in cyprus could set a precedent for other debt-strapped eurozone nations. the s&p, dow can jones and nasdaq all ended down. cyprus struck a deal with european negotiators earlier today, which means big losses at account holders at bankses. >>> it may be spring, but, oh, boy, many parts of the country, including right here in washington, are getting a heavy dose of winter. a powerful storm is packing in some cases historic amounts of snow and blustery winds across the midwest, mid-atlantic, and southern states. winter storm warnings were posted today from new jersey down to north carolina and tennessee, prompting hundreds of flight cancellations and delays. >>> and serious fireworks on
, the decision to invade kuwait then the u.n. sanctions that follow that in the effect it had on iraqi society made it all the more difficult for that society to move toward stability in the wake of the saddam hussein regime. i would blame al qaeda and iraq nd those who used masss murder as a principal tactic in the war. i would ask dr. zbigniew brzezinski to visit the cities in iraq that were rocked by these murderous attacks and ask them who they blame. hey blame the people who committed those murders. in 2005 when we went to a city where life was choked out of it because of a systematic attack by al qaeda, they turned that city into their training base. it is with a connected sniper training, medical training. these are not just insurgencies that happened because people to not like america. these are organizations that mobilize resources and people. this is an enemy organization. courses offer their included kidnapping and murder. they choked the life out of the city. schools have been closed for over a year. marketplaces have a cold. communities have fallen in on themselves -- marketplaces
the situation inside of syria. there are measures we have called for, and we know the u.n. is moving forward with investigations on exactly what happened. i have said publicly that the use of chemical weapons by the assad regime would be a game changer from our perspective. because, once you let that's the situation spend out of control, it is very hard to stop and that will have enormous spillover effects across the region. and so, we are going to continue to closely consult with everybody across the region and do everything we can to break -- bring an end to the bloodshed and to allow the syrian people to get out from under a leader who was lost all legitimacy because he is willing tarot slaughter his own people. -- he is willing to slaughter his own people. it is not a question of if. is when. part of what we have to think about is what is the aftermath going to affect? and by the way, we need to think about that in a way that serves the syrian people from all walks of life, from all religious affiliations. because one of the things we know about this region is that if we fail the -- to c
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the possibility of drone strikes against u.s. citizens. >>> a big day for tech company making its debut in new york city. model n based in redwood city and makes revenue management software for life sciences and technology companies. the company's ceo in new york for that bell ringing. officially did the honors. that is on the new york stock exchange. shares popped right out of the gate. the stock price is up by close to 35%, trades on the market today. the company's share started a dollar more than what was expected by the experts. >>> american airlines defending its plan to give its outgoing ceo almost $20 million in severance pay. american airlines ceo is being replaced by the chief executive officer of us airways, as soon as the two companies complete their merger. a trustee overseeing american airlines bankruptcy objects to the payout. american says bankruptcy code does not apply because the payout will be made by the new airline after the merger pulls it out of bankruptcy. >>> ebay is taking aim at amazon overhauling fees for sellers on the website. starting in april, ebay will let selle
. my question dovetails with jo n's question. based on your withdrawal from iraq, afghanistan, pivot to asia, is the u.s. committed to the gulf region and the middle east in general? if you could elaborate a little more on the general commitment in the region, and if the answer is yes, how can we find more ways to demonstrate that commitment? >> the answer is yes, and expanded answer to that would indeed be how can we find ways to demonstrate our commitment differently. this notion of withdrawing from iraq and afghanistan, as somehow indicative of less commitment to the region, i really would like to react to that. andent three years in iraq, what you have to say -- and we are all aware that tomorrow is the 10-year anniversary and the debate goes on about whether we should have, whether it was worth it, and that debate will go on. even if it is in this room, we all decide that we have a common answer to that question, it will go on, and its shadow on, and we should always be introspective about the things we do. my personal belief is that having given iraq and opportunity -- first of
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